Tag Archives: solar

Shimizu’s Dream: Proposals to Benefit Future Generations

from SHIMIZU Corporation:

Shimizu continues to introduce our vision for the future.
We tackle new technological challenges and present wide-ranging proposals for the benefit of up-coming generations.

Concept: Solar and wind-powered hanging monorail

from Yanko Design:

At the tops of the towers are urban wind power generators. On top of each of the train cars are solar power generators. The interiors of the cars are mostly open, with seats along the sides to conserve space.

The seats inside the cars are made of Corian which is both strong and easy to clean. OLED panels, touch screen interfaces, Wi-Fi internet, headphone jacks, Bluetooth, information boards, interactivity galore!

Artificial photosynthesis achieved with nanotechnology

Pure awesomeness from MIT:

A team of MIT researchers has found a novel way to mimic the process by which plants use the power of sunlight to split water and make chemical fuel to power their growth.

In this case, the team used a modified virus as a kind of biological scaffold that can assemble the nanoscale components needed to split the hydrogen and oxygen atoms of a water molecule.

Splitting water is one way to solve the basic problem of solar energy: It’s only available when the sun shines. By using sunlight to make hydrogen from water, the hydrogen can then be stored and used at any time to generate electricity using a fuel cell, or to make liquid fuels (or be used directly) for cars and trucks.

New robots build prototype solar cells in 30 minutes, then evaluate their own work

from PopSci:

One squat multitasking robot can build semiconductors for solar cells on six-inch-square plates of glass, plastic or flexible metals in just over half an hour.

Six of these tireless mechanical workers, chugging away at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Colorado, will allow private companies to come rapidly prototype and test their newest formulas for creating solar cells.

Solar breakthrough: Nanoclusters extract hydrogen from water with 60% efficiency

from DVICE:

British scientists say they’ve achieved a breakthrough, figuring out how to extract hydrogen from water with an unheard-of 60% efficiency using solar energy.

The secret sauce is nanotechnology, in the form of nanoclusters of indium phosphide encrusted on a gold electrode. Using this, they can turn sunlight into that hotshot hydrogen fuel, clean-burning and as energetic as a swift kick in the ass.

Tiny sensor could run for years harnessing energy from its environment

from Singularity Hub:

The University of Michigan has produced a miniature sensor that harnesses solar energy and could last for years without needing to be replaced.

Composed of a solar cell, processor, and battery, the tiny device is only 2.5×3.5×1mm in size – a thousand times smaller than a commercial version of its type.

“Solar Ivy”: Solar panels that mimic ivy

from S.M.I.T. (Sustainably Minded Interactive Technology)

“Solar Ivy” is a customizable system for sustainable energy generation that mimics the form of ivy and its relationship with the environment.

Flexible photovoltaic “leaves” shift in the wind while converting solar energy into electricity, and shade the building from heat gained through out the day.

Also see: Solar panels that look like ordinary rooftop shingles

A 50-Watt solar-powered cellular network

from MIT’s Technology Review:

An Indian telecom company is deploying simple cell phone base stations that need as little as 50 watts of solar-provided power. It will soon announce plans to sell the equipment in Africa, expanding cell phone access to new ranks of rural villagers who live far from electricity supplies.

First light-powered circuit charges in real-time

from DiscoveryNews (via EVOLKER):

For the first time, scientists have created a circuit that can power itself, as long as it’s left in a beam of sunshine.

Created by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania, the world’s first photovoltaic circuit could eventually power a new line of consumer devices or even model the human brain.

IEET: 10 emerging technology trends of the next 10 years

from The Institute for Ethics & Emerging Technologies:

  • Geoengineering
  • Smart grids
  • Radical materials
  • Synthetic biology
  • Personal genomics
  • Bio-interfaces
  • Data interfaces
  • Solar power
  • Nootropics
  • Cosmeceuticals