Tag Archives: manufacuring

A self-replicating, open-source home factory

from sharable.net:

Today we’re on the verge of a factory in every home thanks to the RepRap, an open hardware 3D printer that is designed to replicate itself. You can make a RepRap for yourself, then use it to make one for your neighbor.

The design files and software needed to build and operate the RepRap are free. You can make one for about $500 in parts. And with each new version of the machine, an increasing percentage of the parts can be produced by the RepRap itself.

3-D printing device could build Moon base from lunar dust and regolith

from Space.com:

Future astronauts might end up living in a moon base created largely from lunar dust and regolith, if a giant 3-D printing device can work on the lunar surface.

The print-on-demand technology, known as D-Shape, could save on launch and transportation costs for manned missions to the moon. But the concept must first prove itself in exploratory tests funded by the European Space Agency (ESA)

Nanofactory concept video

“A nanofactory is a proposed system in which nanomachines (resembling molecular assemblers, or industrial robot arms) would combine molecules to build larger atomically precise parts.”

More details on Invetech & printing 3D body parts

from Next Big Future: <- [Much more at link]

[...] The printer, developed by Invetech, fits inside a standard biosafety cabinet for sterile use. It includes two print heads, one for placing human cells, and the other for placing a hydrogel, scaffold, or support matrix.

Invetech plan to ship a number of 3D bio-printers to Organovo during 2010 and 2011 as a part of the instrument development program. Organovo will be placing the printers globally with researchers in centers of excellence for medical research.

From Hackerspace to your garage: Downloading DIY hardware over the web

from h+ Magazine:

You will likely soon be able to download hardware from the web in the form of free packages of coded instructions to make… well, just about anything — from a Lego block to the jet engine of an F-16.

The impetus behind downloading DIY hardware from the web is to leverage hackerspaces (those collaborative dens of real world hacking), fab labs (fabrication laboratories), and other groups around the world to shift the burden away from “makers” (manufacturers) to a core group of package maintainers who verify hardware designs and make it easy for makers to do what they love best — making things.

Spray-on liquid glass is about to revolutionize almost everything

from physorg:

Spray-on liquid glass is transparent, non-toxic, and can protect virtually any surface against almost any damage from hazards such as water, UV radiation, dirt, heat, and bacterial infections. The coating is also flexible and breathable, which makes it suitable for use on an enormous array of products.

CubeSpawn: Open source personal factories

from CubeSpawn.com

CubeSpawn consists of small Personal Factories which will, at first, make their own parts, and later make as many different things as are added to the parts library.

A “Cube” form factor makes all the machines standard, so that they can be linked together to form assembly lines, in addition, each machine has a pallet mover in the base to transport workpieces between cubes.

Plans for the first machine are expected to be published around mid-march of 2010. The plans will be freely distributed, kits will be available shortly after, for those who do not have the time, or tools to build one from scratch.