Tag Archives: 3-D

Researchers analyze performance of first updatable holographic 3D display

from PHYSORG:

In 2008, researchers from the University of Arizona created a holographic 3D display that could write and erase images, making it the first updatable (or rewritable) holographic 3D display ever demonstrated.

Now, in a follow-up study, the researchers have reported the results of their analysis on the performance of the display, including how the polymer enables display enhancements and what more needs to be done before such displays can be widely used.

Gesture-based computing on the cheap

from MIT News:

With a single piece of inexpensive hardware — a multicolored glove — MIT researchers are making Minority Report-style interfaces more accessible.

“This actually gets the 3-D configuration of your hand and your fingers,” Wang says. “We get how your fingers are flexing.”

Exhibitors showcase latest glasses-free 3D display, e-paper technologies at Finetech Japan 2010

from Digitimes:

Color e-paper and 3D glasses-free display products were a major attraction at the just concluded Finetech Japan 2010 in Tokyo.

Newsight showcased a series 3D displays requiring no glasses, including a 70-inch model for public display applications. The company claimed that the 70-inch model was the largest 3D display in the world.

Bridgestone displayed a 13.1-inch touchscreen 4,096-color e-paper enabled by color filter (CF).

Intel guru says 3-D Internet will arrive within five years

from ComputerWorld:

Sean Koehl, a technology evangelist with Intel Labs, said technology is emerging that will one day change the way we interact with electronic devices and with each other.

That could come as soon as five years from now when, he predicted, there will be realistic-looking three-dimensional applications.”The Internet may never go fully 3-D, but making 3-D environments broadly accessible is probably capable within five years,” noted Koehl.

MIT’s BiDi Screen: A thin depth-sensing LCD for 3D gesture interaction using light fields

from web.media.mit.edu: <- video, specs, & more at link

The BiDi Screen is an example of a new type of I/O device that possesses the ability to both capture images and display them. This thin, bidirectional screen extends the latest trend in LCD devices, which has seen the incorporation of photo-diodes into every display pixel.

Using a novel optical masking technique developed at the Media Lab, the BiDi Screen can capture lightfield-like quantities, unlocking a wide array of applications from 3-D gesture interaction with CE devices, to seamless video communication.

Researchers create 3D invisibility cloak

from NEXT BIG FUTURE:

Researchers at Germany’s Karlsruhe Institute of Technology report they were able to cloak a tiny bump in a layer of gold, preventing its detection at nearly visible infrared frequencies.

(for illustrative purposes only – no one yet invisibly stalking you)

The cloak is a structure of crystals with air spaces in between, sort of like a woodpile, that bends light, hiding the bump in the gold later beneath, the researchers reported in Thursday’s online edition of the journal Science.

Company offering 3D holographic projections

http://arena3d.com/ (Flash site)

Video: 3D printed robot arm

from Shapeways: (via Bruce Sterling)

It is early days yet but the first iteration of Kris Reed’s actuated robot arm looks very promising.

You can check out Kris’ blog post on how he came to make his arm here or see the 3D printed robot arm that will one day subjugate humanity in action below.

More details on Invetech & printing 3D body parts

from Next Big Future: <- [Much more at link]

[...] The printer, developed by Invetech, fits inside a standard biosafety cabinet for sterile use. It includes two print heads, one for placing human cells, and the other for placing a hydrogel, scaffold, or support matrix.

Invetech plan to ship a number of 3D bio-printers to Organovo during 2010 and 2011 as a part of the instrument development program. Organovo will be placing the printers globally with researchers in centers of excellence for medical research.

Swarm of micro-helicopters could create a giant 3D display

from WIRED:

Mechanical fireflies could help create a new kind of 3-D display, say researchers at MIT

“Each of the helicopters then acts as what we call a smart pixel,” E Roon Kang, the MIT research fellow who is leading the project, told Wired.com. “By controlling their movement, we can have the pixels flying through the air.

Sugar-powered fuel cells & 3D batteries

from Next Big Future:

Bruce Dunn is a Professor of Materials Science at UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science. Follow him (video below) around UCLA’s campus as he discusses 3-dimensional batteries and demonstrates fuel cells powered by sugar.

Gesture Cube concept device detects movements in 3D space (vid)

from Gizmo Watch:

First commercial 3-D bio-printer makes human tissue and organs

from R&D Magazine:

“Scientists and engineers can use the 3-D bio printers to enable placing cells of almost any type into a desired pattern in 3-D,” said Murphy.

[...] Ultimately the idea would be for surgeons to have tissue on demand for various uses, and the best way to do that is get a number of bio-printers into the hands of researchers and give them the ability to make three dimensional tissues on demand.”

Also see: The Desktop Manufacturing Revolution

Could 3D printing be the next revolution in cooking?

from Gizmag:

Wouldn’t it be great to have a digital food machine sitting in your kitchen that could create any dish, real or imagined, from scratch at the touch of a button?

Cornucopia: Digital Gastronomy is a concept design that uses the well-established principles of 3D printing – plus precisely timed and temperature-controlled mixing and cooking – to open the door to a virtually limitless realm of replicable, creative cuisine in shapes and combinations that are simply impossible using our current, centuries-old cooking techniques. It’s a wonderful look into the future of cooking, from the creative food lover’s perspective.

Innovision’s Plug & Play ‘Holographic’ Projector (vid)

from Singularity Hub:

We may not have true holographic displays for several years yet, but in the meantime, there are plenty of people willing to provide us with something that looks pretty darn close. The latest of these is Innovision Labs out of Taiwan, which has started to sell its Holo AD, a 3D display case that is (nearly) plug and play.

HP plans a line of (relatively) affordable 3-D printers

from GadgetLab:

Printers equipped for 3-D are poised to go mainstream, now that Hewlett-Packard plans to start selling them. The company’s inkjet and laser printers are staples in offices and homes.

The devices, which can crank out three-dimensional plastic models through a process similar to printing text on sheets of paper, have until recently been available only to high-end industrial designers. HP’s devices will be targeted at a broader market of mechanical-design professionals, and will probably cost less than $15,000.

“This is the boldest step we have seen so far in 3-D printing,” says Scott Summit, chief technology officer for Bespoke Innovations, a company that creates 3-D artifacts for medical use. “A lot of people want to do 3-D printing but it is a mysterious world. With HP embracing it, it is likely to demystify the idea to many consumers.”

Also see: 3-D Printers Make Manufacturing Accessible

3-D printers can take blobs of plastic and shape them into almost any object you desire. Now, thanks to open source hardware designs and enthusiastic do-it-yourselfers, these printers are increasingly popular and accessible. People are using them to fabricate iPod docks, plastic bracelets, hair clips and miniature teapots at home.