Monthly Archives: January 2010

Organic transistor paves way for next generation of neuro-inspired CPUs

from Science Daily:

For the first time, researchers have developed a transistor that can mimic the main functionalities of a synapse.

A newly developed organic transistor has opened the way to new generations of neuro-inspired computers, capable of responding in a manner similar to the nervous system.

Envisioning the future of Augmented (hyper)Reality

from ronwolf.com:

According to the filmmaker Keiichi Matsuda, “Augmented reality may recontextualise the functions of consumerism and architecture, and change in the way in which we operate within it.”

And to display some less-than-optimistic viewpoints:

The ‘most beautiful’ math structure appears in lab for first time ever

from NewScientist:

A complex form of mathematical symmetry linked to string theory has been glimpsed in the real world for the first time, in laboratory experiments on exotic crystals.

Mathematicians discovered a complex 248-dimensional symmetry called E8 in the late 1800s. The dimensions in the structure are not necessarily spatial, like the three dimensions we live in, but they correspond to mathematical degrees of freedom, where each dimension represents a different variable.

Supercomputer shares universe simulations

from MSNBC:

Fully-rendered simulation streaming online allows scientists to collaborate

Supercomputing has helped astrophysicists create massive models of the universe, but such simulations remain out of reach for many in the United States and around the world. That could all change after a successful test allowed scientists in Portland, Ore. to watch a Chicago-based simulation of how ordinary matter and mysterious dark matter evolved in the early universe.

Optomec can now print touch-screen displays

from NEXT BIG FUTURE:

“You would have crashed your stupid flying car anyway”

From Three Panel Soul:

Could written language be rendered obsolete?

from SmartMobs:

THE FUTURIST – January 29th, 2010

If written language is merely a technology for transferring information, then it can and should be replaced by a newer technology that performs the same function more fully and effectively. But it’s up to us, as the consumers and producers of technology, to insist that the would-be replacement demonstrate authentic superiority. It’s not enough for new devices, systems, and gizmos to simply be more expedient than what they are replacing—as the Gatling gun was over the rifle—or more marketable—as unfiltered cigarettes were over pipe tobacco. We owe it to posterity to demand proof that people’s communications will be more intelligent, persuasive, and constructive when they occur over digital media, and proof that digital media, and proof that illiteracy, even in an age of great technological capability, will improve people’s lives.

I first see a form of visual language overtaking our present rudimentary mouth-sounds. But after that – who knows?